van

Translate

Wednesday, 29 February 2012

Bailed Kyle Thain and James Harris return from Spain

 

Two men from Essex accused of attempted murder in Spain have returned to England. Kyle Thain, 24, and James Harris, 29, had been in Spain for the past seven months after being accused of attacking two men in an Alicante bar in July 2011. The pair, both from Southend, were held in a Spanish prison for four months without charge. They have now been allowed to return to England on strict bail conditions. Mr Harris returned to the UK on Tuesday and his friend Mr Thain arrived at Stansted Airport on Wednesday evening. New lawyer As part of the conditions of their return to the UK, both men must sign in at the Spanish consulate in London twice a month. Speaking before her son Mr Thain's arrival, Sharon Harris, said: "I am so excited and nervous at the same time. "I still can't believe it. I won't be happy until I've got my arms around him at the airport." Both men have protested their innocence and have said they can prove they were elsewhere at the time of the attack. They were released from jail in November and given their passports back after each paid £6,000 in bail, but were told they could not leave the country. A new lawyer has now negotiated their return home. Pablo Sebastian, a Spanish lawyer working in Alicante with offices in Hadleigh in Essex, has been helping the boys' families secure their release. "We are very relieved to have them home," he said. "It is an improvement because they are back with their friends, family and at their jobs." 'Lives disrupted' Mr Sebastian said the men's "impeccable behaviour" while on bail in Spain had persuaded the Spanish judge to allow them back to the UK. It is thought the men's families have paid about £25,000 to cover travel, accommodation and legal costs since the pair were arrested. The men must now wait to hear if they must return to Spain for a trial. Richard Howitt, MEP for the East of England, is now calling for a change in European law to ensure minimum standards of justice across all member states. "The idea they have been several months in prison, outside the country and suffered such a huge financial loss is unacceptable," he said. "If we had a system whereby you respect and uphold each other's system of justice, then Kyle and James could have come home seven months ago. "But their lives have been totally disrupted, as have their families', which is why we need better standards of judicial co-operation at European level."

Gang murdered drug dealer then blew up his house

 

Drugs gang executed one of their dealer's and then blew up his house to cover-up the murder, a court heard this afternoon. Colliston Edwards, 38, of no fixed address and Andre Johnson, 25, also of no fixed address are accused of shooting Leroy Burnett, 43, after he kept back some of their money from drugs deals. Max Walter, 21, of no fixed address was then recruited by the pair to blow-up his house in Crichton Road, Battersea the Old Bailey heard. Mr Burnett was allegedly a low level drug supplier, who dealt drugs in Wandsworth Road and the Nine Elms area on behalf of Edwards. Edwards, whose street name is Lousy, was allegedly a drug dealer who commuted between Doncaster and South London and worked in a team with Johnson, known as Tallman. The court heard that Lousy had two mobile phones and gave out the numbers to his customers, travelling to their homes to sell the drugs. He allegedly expected Mr Burnett to carry out sales and look after his phones whilst he was away in Doncaster, but problems arose when Mr Burnett started miscounting money owed to him. Prosecuting, Aftab Jaffbrjee said: "There was simply no reason other than this pernicious deed of drugs supply to cost Leroy his life. Ads by Google Build Eco Friendly Visit us Today for Carbon Reduction Eco Tips for Construction Industry! www.CutCarbon.info Election Boundary Changes Constituencies are changing. Have your say on our report, Autumn 2013 independent.gov.uk/boundarychanges "He was executed in his home having been shot in the head at point blank range. There was nothing else that accounted in his life for such a brutal attack. "Walter then blew up the entire house causing destruction to the building and the street." Edwards and Johnson are both on trial for joint enterprise of murder and intending to pervert the course of justice. They deny having anything to do with the murder or the cover-up. Walter has pleaded guilty to perverting the course of justice and arson, but denies being reckless as to whether life was endangered. The trial which opened this afternoon is expected to last six weeks.

Drug gangs report blasting UK cities as dangerous

 

 Comment By Professor Alan Stevens Drug gangs report blasting UK cities as dangerous is too confusing The problems are nowhere near as deep in Manchester or Liverpool as they are in Rio de Janeiro – or even San Francisco A masked municipal policeman stands outside a shopping mall in MexicoAP On one hand it is right to state that there are communities in British cities suffering from social exclusion and marginalisation and that this contributes to their drug and crime problems. But on the other, these ­problems are nowhere near as deep in Manchester or Liverpool as they are in Rio de Janeiro or Ciudad Juarez – or even San Francisco or Los Angeles. The problem with the INCB report is that the wording is unclear. It gives the impression that its comments on no-go areas could apply equally to all of these cities. But it should have been more careful in specifying which ones it was referring to. The cities in Central and South America have more extreme ­problems which come from bigger social inequalities. They are dramatically more affected by crime and health problems. For example, in the past few years in Rio there have been repeated attempts to crack down on the areas controlled by violent drug markets. For a while these places were no-go zones. But authorities have acted in a militaristic fashion in the past year as they prepare for the World Cup.

British cities are becoming no-go areas where drugs gangs are effectively in control


British cities are becoming no-go areas where drugs gangs are effectively in control, a United Nations drugs chief said yesterday. Professor Hamid Ghodse, president of the UN’s International Narcotics Control Board (INCB), said there was “a vicious cycle of social exclusion and drugs problems and fractured communities” in cities such as Birmingham, Liverpool and Manchester. The development of “no-go areas” was being fuelled by threats such as social inequality, migration and celebrities normalising drug abuse, he warned. Helping marginalised communities with drugs problems “must be a priority”, he said. “We are looking at social cohesion, the social disintegration and illegal drugs. “In many societies around the world, whether developed or developing, there are communities within the societies which develop which become no-go areas. “Drug traffickers, organised crime, drug users, they take over. They will get the sort of governance of those areas.” Prof Ghodse called for such communities to be offered drug abuse prevention programmes, treatment and rehabilitation services, and the same levels of educational, employment and recreational opportunities as in the wider society. The INCB’s annual report for 2011 found persistent social inequality, migration, emerging cultures of excess and a shift in traditional values were some of the key threats to social cohesion. As the gap between rich and poor widens, and “faced with a future with limited opportunities, individuals within these communities may increasingly become disengaged from the wider society and become involved in a range of personally and socially harmful behaviours, including drug abuse and drug dealing,” it said.

Tuesday, 28 February 2012

Britain’s biggest international criminals has walked free from court despite been accused of attempting to smuggle £80 million worth of cocaine into the U.K.

A man who was named one of the Britain’s biggest international criminals has walked free from court despite been accused of attempting to smuggle £80 million worth of cocaine into the U.K.

Jamie Dempsey, 33, was suspected of plotting to flood London and the south-east with 299kg (660lb) of high-purity cocaine in 2009.

He appeared on a ‘most wanted’ list of crooks hiding in the Costa Del Sol - nicknamed ‘Costa Del Crime’ - and even featured on BBC’s Crimewatch programme.

Freed: Jamie Dempsey, centre, leaves court with his friends and family after being acquitted of his involvement in an £80m euro cocaine empire

Freed: Jamie Dempsey, centre, leaves court with his friends and family after being acquitted of his involvement in an £80m euro cocaine empire

Speaking outside of court after being cleared of any wrongdoing, Dempsey said: 'I’m just relieved the nightmare is over.

'I couldn’t be further from being a criminal - I’m just a penniless plumber from Essex.

 

 

 

'I was in Marbella at my parent’s house when I was arrested - the police simply got the wrong man, it was a case of mistaken identity but I don’t want to say any more.

'My face has been all over the TV and the newspapers, my friends and family have been put through hell.h

'I just want to have a good meal and get on with my life.'

Arrested: Dempsey was cuffed in Benhavis, a mountain village near Marbella in Spain in a police operation that cost £1m

Hiding place: Dempsey was cuffed in Benhavis, a mountain village near Marbella in Spain in a police operation that cost £1m

A two-year investigation, costing over £1million pounds, was launched to track Dempsey who was believed to be evading capture in Spain.

Officers from the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) finally arrested him with the help of the Spanish police in Benhavis, Marbella, last May following a tip-off from the public.

His capture was hailed as a 'great result' but on Monday he was dramatically cleared of conspiracy to supply cocaine after a four-week trial.

Last May police named Dempsey as a suspected drug lord living the high life in the Costa Del Sol.

But a jury of five men and four women took nine-and-a-half hours to find him not guilty.

Judge Michael Pert ordered the court to be cleared after Dempsey’s family erupted into cheers after the verdict was read out. 

Fernando Hurtado was sentenced to 28 years in jail at Leicester Crown Court
John Esqulant was sentenced to 28 years in jail at Leicester Crown

Jailed: Fernando Hurtado, left, and John Esqulant, right, were both sentenced to 28 years behind bars

Speaking outside Leicester Crown Court his sister Natalie Dempsey, 24, said: 'We are just happy he’s coming home.

'Our family has been torn apart because of this. We’re going to give him a proper Essex home coming.

'The champagne will be flowing in Chigwell when he comes home. He doesn’t normally drink or smoke but he’ll want to party hard after all this.

'The police got the wrong man but they didn’t care. They just wanted to arrest someone in the Costa Del Sol and send them down.'

Last year three people arrested in the same police ‘sting’ operation as Dempsey were jailed for a total of 55 years.

Taxi driver John Esqulant and Colombian Fernando Hurtado were each jailed for 23 years at the same court after they were convicted of conspiracy to supply cocaine.

Part-time model and promising footballer Frank Stedman was jailed for nine years after admitting the same offence.

The sting operation began in March 2009 when officers posed as criminals who could arrange delivery of the drugs.

Three Soca agents met 41-year-old Hurtado, from Woking, Surrey, at a site in Waltham Abbey, Essex, to organise the delivery.

Two weeks later, Stedman, 26, of North Weald, Essex, paid the officers £320,800 in cash as part-payment for the drugs.

Shortly after the handover in April, armed officers stopped the van containing the Class A drug near an industrial estate in Markfield, Leics.

Esqulant, 52, of Theydon Bois, Essex, and Hurtado were arrested the same day while Stedman was brought in as he stepped off a flight at Heathrow airport in June 2010.



Scotland Yard lent police horse to Rebekah Brooks

 

The former Sun and News of the World editor was lent the horse in 2008, the year after Clive Goodman, who worked for her as royal editor of the News of the World, was jailed for phone-hacking along withe the private investigator Glenn Mulcaire. Officers from the Metropolitan Police Mounted Branch visited Mrs Brooks's home in the Cotswolds to check she had suitable facilities and was a competent rider before the horse went there. A spokesman for the Metropolitan Police pointed out that it is routine for retired Mounted Branch horses to be lent out to members of the public at the end of their working lives, but the arrangement is likely to raise fresh questions about the Met's relationship with Mrs Brooks. The news comes a day after the Leveson Inquiry was told that Mrs Brooks was briefed by a senior Met officer on the progress of the original phone-hacking inquiry and even consulted on how far she thought the investigation should go. Mrs Brooks, who is married to the former racehorse trainer Charlie Brooks, kept the horse at her home in the Cotswolds for two years before giving it back to the Metropolitan Police in 2010.  It was then found a new home in Norfolk with a serving police officer. Dave Wilson, Mrs Brooks's spokesman, said: "It's well known by people in the horse world that the Met looks for homes for horses once they retire. Rebekah took on a horse and effectively acted as a foster parent for it for a year or so. "The Met horse team comes out to make sure your facilities are right and proper. It's just a way of giving a temporary home to a horse that has had a distinguished service in the Met. It went off to a retirement paddock in Norfolk once it couldn't be ridden any more." At the time Mrs Brooks took on the horse, she was editor of The Sun, but had given evidence to a committee of MPs five years earlier admitting that the News of the World had paid policemen when she was editor of the Sunday paper between 2000 and 2003. By the time she gave the horse back to the Met she was chief executive of News International and the Met was facing calls to re-open its investigation into phone hacking following the disclosure that thousands of names of potential victims appeared in Mulcaire's notebooks. A spokesman for Scotland Yard said: "When a police horse reaches the end of its working life, Mounted Branch officers find it a suitable retirement home. Whilst responsibility for feeding the animal and paying vet bills passes to the person entrusted to its care at its new home, the horse remains the property of the Metropolitan Police Service. "Retired police horses are not sold on and can be returned to the care of the MPS at any time. In 2008 a retired MPS horse was loaned to Rebekah Brooks. The horse was subsequently re-housed with a police officer in 2010." The Metropolitan Police website states that: "At the end of the police horse's working life the animal is re-homed at one of many identified establishments who have previously contacted the Mounted Branch with a view to offering a home. "The Mounted Branch is looking for suitable homes for retired horses, that is homes where the horse will not be ridden. Anyone in the southeast of England offering such a home will be considered first."

Bank tax dodges halted by retrospective law

 

A bank in the UK has been forced to pay more than half a billion pounds in tax which it had dodged by using "highly abusive" tax avoidance schemes. One tax dodge involved the bank claiming it should not have to pay corporation tax on profits made when buying back its own IOUs. The government said it would change the law retrospectively and immediately to stop anyone else using the scheme. The identity of the bank has so far not been revealed. Announcing the crackdown, the Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury, David Gauke, said the bank should never have devised the schemes in the first place. "The bank that disclosed these schemes to HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) has adopted the Banking Code of Practice on Taxation which contains a commitment not to engage in tax avoidance," he said. "The government is clear that these are not transactions that a bank that has adopted the code should be undertaking. "We do not take today's action lightly, but the potential tax loss from this scheme and the history of previous abuse in this area mean that this is a circumstance where the decision to change the law with full retrospective effect is justified," he added. The second tax avoidance scheme, designed by the same bank, involved investment funds claiming that non-taxable income entitled the funds to tax credits that could be reclaimed from HMRC. The Treasury described this as "an attempt to secure 'repayment' from the Exchequer of tax that has not been paid". Compulsory notification A Treasury source suggested that outlawing the tax dodges immediately would save the government a further £2bn in tax that would otherwise have been foregone. The bank in question in fact disclosed the two schemes to the tax authorities under rules which have been in place since 2004. Anyone, such as a bank, accountant, lawyer or tax adviser, who devises a seemingly legal tax avoidance plan, is obliged to tell the tax authorities about it within a few days of using it or marketing it to clients. More than 2,000 schemes have been disclosed in the past eight years. "Quite a few of the disclosures have come from banks in the past," said John Whiting, of the Chartered Institute of Taxation (CIOT). "They are usually intended to sell to others such as clients." New code The banking code on taxation was first introduced by the Labour government in June 2009. It followed reports that some big banks used large scale tax avoidance schemes involving complex transactions and financial instruments. The code - which was supported by the incoming coalition government the following year - demands that banks which sign ensure that their tax and the tax obligations of their customers are observed. It says they should not go out of their way to avoid tax for themselves or clients. The 15 biggest banks operating in the UK have signed up. 'Treated even-handedly' In a separate development, HMRC said it would appoint a senior official to act as an "assurance commissioner" for any tax deals struck with big companies for more than £100m. The job of the commissioner will be to make sure taxpayers in general do not suffer from any such settlements. The move follows severe criticism last December from MPs on the public accounts committee who denounced HMRC for appearing to cut contentious tax deals with companies such as Vodafone and Goldman Sachs. Lin Homer, the new HMRC chief executive said: "This commissioner will take the role of challenging whether any proposed settlement secured the correct amount of tax efficiently and that taxpayers had been treated even-handedly." "The commissioner will also make sure that the governance procedures have been followed," she added.

The daily Sun had systematically paid large sums of money to “a network of corrupted officials” in the British police, military and government.


A day after presiding over the publication of his new, damn-the-critics Sun on Sunday tabloid, Rupert Murdoch was confronted with fresh allegations from a top police investigator that the daily Sun had systematically paid large sums of money to “a network of corrupted officials” in the British police, military and government. Connect With Us on Twitter Follow @nytimesworld for international breaking news and headlines. Twitter List: Reporters and Editors Readers’ Comments Share your thoughts. Post a Comment » Read All Comments (130) » The allegations, part of a deepening criminal probe into The Sun and Mr. Murdoch’s defunct News of the World, highlight the challenges to Mr. Murdoch and his News Corporation as he seeks to minimize the threat to his British media holdings. They also cast a harsh spotlight on the freewheeling pay-for-information culture of the British media. In public testimony on Monday, Deputy Assistant Commissioner Sue Akers, who is leading the criminal investigation into Mr. Murdoch’s newspapers, said The Sun, long a source of special pride and attention for Mr. Murdoch, had illegally paid the unidentified officials hundreds of thousands of dollars in exchange for news tips and “salacious gossip.” She said the payments had been authorized “at a very senior level within the newspaper.” Her comments, unusual during a continuing criminal inquiry, directly undercut Mr. Murdoch’s campaign of support for the embattled newspaper. On Feb. 17, the 80-year-old Mr. Murdoch made a grand entrance into the Sun newsroom, where, marching around in shirtsleeves, he vowed to reinstate journalists suspended in the criminal investigation, offered to pay their legal bills, issued a robust statement about the paper’s probity and announced that he was defying conventional industry wisdom by starting a Sunday issue. Ms. Akers said illegal activities had been rife at the paper. “There appears to have been a culture at The Sun of illegal payments, and systems have been created to facilitate such payments whilst hiding the identity of the officials receiving the money,” she told the Leveson Inquiry on media ethics and practices, led by Lord Justice Leveson. The payments involved “frequent and sometimes significant sums of money” to public officials, she said. In a statement, Mr. Murdoch said that “the practices Sue Akers described at the Leveson Inquiry are ones of the past, and no longer exist at The Sun.” He remained publicly bullish, helping promote the new Sun on Sunday in newspaper stores and announcing on Twitter that it had sold 3.26 million copies. In another blow to Mr. Murdoch, related this time to The News of the World, a lawyer for the Leveson Inquiry said Rebekah Brooks, a former Murdoch executive, was apparently informed by the police in 2006 that detectives had evidence that the cellphones of dozens of celebrities, politicians and sports figures had been illegally hacked by an investigator working for the newspaper. The disclosure, contained in a September 2006 e-mail from a company lawyer to the editor of The News of the World, Andy Coulson, is highly significant. Until late in 2010, Mrs. Brooks, Mr. Coulson and other officials at News International, the British newspaper arm of News Corporation, repeatedly asserted that the hacking had been limited to a single “rogue reporter” — the paper’s royal correspondent, Clive Goodman. The assertion was rendered implausible, at best, by the fact that the police had information that so many hacking victims existed, and that so few of them had anything to do with the royal family. Monday’s disclosures could not have come at a more inopportune time for Mr. Murdoch. In recent weeks, morale at The Sun hit a low point after a number of senior editors and reporters were arrested on suspicion of illegally paying sources. At the same time, journalists at The Sun and elsewhere released a stream of angry attacks at the police, saying the investigation had gone too far and was targeting reporters for what they said was normal behavior in the British tabloid press like taking sources out to lunch or paying whistle-blowers. “The Sun journalists who have been arrested are not accused of enriching themselves — they were simply researching stories about scandals at hospitals, scandals at army bases and scandals in police stations that they believed their readers were entitled to know about,” Kelvin Mackenzie, a former editor of The Sun, wrote in The Daily Mail. “If the whistle-blower asks for money, so what?” The Metropolitan Police Service’s highly unusual decision to release specific details of a continuing investigation seemed designed to rebut such criticism. “The cases we are investigating are not ones involving the odd drink, or meal, to police officers or other public officials,” Ms. Akers said. “Instead, these are cases in which arrests have been made involving the delivery of regular, frequent and sometimes significant sums of money to small numbers of public officials by journalists.”

Monday, 27 February 2012

You can buy a Kalashnikov for a hundred euros on the back streets of Athens


"You can buy a Kalashnikov for a hundred euros on the back streets of Athens and people are doing so to guard their property," Mr Chrysanthopoulos told me from his home outside the capital yesterday. Thanks to the disastrous euro, his country is sliding remorselessly towards bankruptcy and disintegration. Modern Greece is an economic corpse, kept on life support by Germany and France, who fear the euro will be destroyed if they admit the truth. Last week's £110BILLION bailout was not aimed at rescuing the Greek people. It was to save the euro from total collapse. Yet the country seems doomed to another historic crisis as disastrous as the German occupation, a bloody civil war and years of military rule. "What we risk today is anarchy, the collapse of society and a breakdown in law and order," says Mr Chrysanthopoulos, 66. "We have more than 20,000 homeless families in Athens alone. "There are food lines for the hungry, which have not been seen since the Second World War. "Penniless pensioners are begging in the streets. People are bartering for essentials, living hand to mouth." Sooner or later they will be thrown out of the euro — the greatest peacetime catastrophe in the history of Europe. Hatred seethes against Germany, which in 1942 reduced Greece to starvation and slavery during its brutal Nazi occupation. A Greek radio station has just been fined for describing German Chancellor Angela Merkel as a "dirty Berlin slut". Nazi resistance fighter Manolis Glezos, now 89, says Germany plundered Greece for the equivalent of £138billion in the 1940s. "They grab us by the throat for the debt — let's do the same to them for the reparations," he says. Germans hit back, branding the Greeks "idle swindlers". They claim nobody pays tax because bandit politicians steal their money. The insults are fuelling precisely the nationalistic antagonism that sowed the seeds for two world wars — and which the EU was created to eliminate forever. Germany and France, who must accept the blame for allowing Greece into the euro at all, are terrified of contagion. So they are forcing this humiliated nation to slash pay and pensions to starvation levels. Last week's costly bailout has bought time — and the fantasy of an orderly default. Mr Chrysanthopoulos feels betrayed by the euro currency con. But he is not alone. Charles Kennedy, the Lib Dems' fervently pro-euro ex-leader, last week admitted: "I was wrong." His successor, the made-in-Brussels Nick Clegg, admits he would no longer join the euro. Two former editors of the fanatically pro-Brussels Financial Times confess they backed the wrong horse. Ex-EU Commissioner Frits Bolkestein admits: "The euro has failed." We will never hear honesty like that from Ken Clarke and Michael Heseltine, who lost the Tories three elections by stoking the row over Europe. But unlike Mr Chrysanthopoulos, they will probably die comfortably in their beds without witnessing the hideous consequences. Greek instability risks spilling over to fragile ex-fascist regimes Spain and Portugal. If it does, we can only hope it doesn't bring chaos to Italy — then to France. People will take only so much belt-tightening austerity. More revolutions have been triggered by oppressive taxes than anything else. The drive for ever closer political and economic union and the end of national rivalry was aimed at ending war in Europe. We must pray the arrogant fools who launched this undemocratic juggernaut do not achieve precisely the opposite.

TONY Adams has been compared to TV gangster Tony Soprano, and his gang are rumoured to be responsible for 25 murders.

 

 When he appeared in court last November, he gave his address as the cottage in Barnet. Land Registry documents confirm the property is owned by Cole, 31. There is no suggestion of any wrongdoing by the player, who has a multi-million-pound property investment portfolio. Adams, once said to be worth £150 million, headed a notorious North London crime gang nicknamed the A-team or Adams Family. He bought a yacht and sent his daughter to a private school. But in 2007 he was jailed for seven years — for money laundering his own wages — after an undercover operation by MI5 and the Serious Organised Crime Agency. Just like Chicago mobster Al Capone, he had escaped justice for years before finally being nailed for tax evasion. Officers spent 21 months and £10 million eavesdropping on Adams. During the probe his accountant was killed in a drive-by shooting, and a hitman was reputedly buried in the foundations of London's O2 Arena. A search of Adams' £1million former home uncovered £700,000 worth of stolen goods. Adams was released in 2010 after serving half his sentence. But last year he was sent back to do the rest of his time after he defied a financial reporting order and failed to declare luxury purchases including a £7,500 facelift. His earliest release date is now December 2013.

Britain’s crime hot spots revealed

 

The findings, posted on an interactive website, will allow the public to discover how many cases of robbery, vehicle crime and other offences take place in their area – and to rank areas from best to worst. Oxford Street in London's West End was revealed to be the shopping destination surrounded by the most crime. During 2011, there were 656 vehicle crimes, 915 robberies and 2,597 violent crimes within three quarters of a mile of the Oxford Street branch of John Lewis. There were also 5,039 reported instances of anti-social behaviour – equivalent to 14 a day. High streets and shopping centres in Bristol, Brighton and Derby also featured in a top 10 of crime hot spots, according to the website ukcrimestats.com.  A spokesman for the New West End Company, which represents Oxford Street traders, said: "We need to remember that this is an area with extremely high footfall, with over 200 million visits a year. This data needs to be seen in context. "Oxford Street has seen an overall reduction in crime over the past 10 years, with our lobby for harder sentencing on crime having a positive impact." The Croydon postcode CR0 was found to have the highest number of crimes reported last year, with 5,000 more than any other postal area. The south London suburb was the scene of some of the most severe rioting last summer. During 2011, 2,081 burglaries, 3,258 violent crimes and 8,316 instances of anti-social behaviour were reported in the CR0 postcode district. Dan Lewis, the chief executive of the Economic Policy Centre, the Right-of-centre think-tank which carried out the analysis and created the website, said: "On the one hand it is good that the Government is now publishing such detailed crime statistics, but the official police website does not allow the public to put these figures in context. "It has taken us, as a private sector provider, to harness this data in a way which is much more helpful to consumers. "It's not just important that the Government becomes more transparent, it's vital that what information is published is actually useful to the public." Seven of the 10 schools with the highest number of crimes within three quarters of a mile of their gates were in London. Two were in Portsmouth and one in Bristol. Almost 8,250 acts of anti-social behaviour, robbery, vehicle crime or violent crime were reported within three quarters of a mile of Charing Cross railway station in London last year, 1,700 more than Newcastle's central railway station, which had the second-highest crime rate. There were also high numbers of crimes around stations in Birmingham, Blackpool and east London. Anyone craving a life free from crime should consider a move to Wales. Nearly a third of the 50 postcode districts with the lowest number of reported crimes last year were in Wales, with several on the island of Anglesey. Official figures suggest that the Welsh village of Garndolbenmaen, on the edge of the Snowdonia national park, had one reported crime last year – a single case of anti-social behaviour. Steve Churchman, who runs the village shop serving the 300 residents, said the area was "like Beirut" when he moved there from London eight years ago. "We had a real problem with anti-social behaviour back then," said Mr Churchman. "There was this gang of kids. We had a phonebox vandalised, a bus stop graffitied and a few break-ins." Mr Churchman said the falling crime figures in the village were a result of pushing for convictions on those residents who stepped out of line and having police office and community support officers out on the beat. The children who caused the trouble had grown up and were now "nice lads", he added.

Gangster’s moll rents a house from Ashley Cole

 

Gangster's moll Ruth Adams, 51, pays about £1,500 a month to rent the Chelsea defender's three-bedroom cottage. Her husband Terry, 57 — a fan of Chelsea's London rivals Arsenal — also lived at the property for 17 months between prison sentences. He moved in to the £600,000 home in Barnet, North London, after his release from a seven-year stretch for money laundering, before being banged up again last year. Neighbours often see loyal Ruth — who married Adams 29 years ago — driving a top-of-the-range Lexus. One local said: "It's funny that it's Cole's house because Terry is an avid Arsenal fan and was once linked to buying the Gunners. "Ruth is very polite but won't engage you in conversation for long. She's still close to her husband."

MURDER INVESTIGATION: Police arrest four after man is stabbed to death in Camden Town

MURDER squad detectives have made four arrests after a man was stabbed to death in Camden Town in the early hours of this morning (Sunday). Early reports had linked the Inverness Street attack with Liverpool football fans who were in London last night ahead of today's Carling Cup Final at Wembley. Met Police said they did not believe the incident was "football related" but confirmed the 26-year-old knife victim was from Merseyside. Witnesses said people in Inverness Street at the time of the attack were not wearing football colours but large crowds of supporters had been drinking and chanting there earlier in the evening. Accountant Chad Williams, who lives in Inverness Street, said: "I looked out the window when I heard screaming. One guy was on the floor outside Bar Uno. "There was chaos out there for the next five minutes. The emergency services were there – they were with the guy for 45 minutes. "There was a guy, a young guy with blonde hair, he went to help him. He performed CPR. He was pumping at his chest. There was an awful lot of blood. It was all over him, too. "The emergency services arrived and did everything you would want of them." There was an eerie hush in Camden Town today as excited tourists coming out of the tube station were confronted by the scene. A post-mortem examination is expected to take place today.

Saturday, 25 February 2012

Two men jailed for smuggling £1.6m cocaine haul dissolved in bags containing 550 live tropical fish

 

A pair of Polish drug criminals who tried to smuggle 17 kilos of cocaine into Britain inside live tropical fish were jailed yesterday. Olaf Urlik, 33, and Norbert Jarzabek, 32, both originally from Poland, first practised and then attempted to smuggle the high purity cocaine, worth an estimated £1.6m at wholesale, from Colombia into the UK. The drug was dissolved in bags of fluid and then stored inside larger bags with the live fish, the Serious Organised Crime Agency (Soca) said.

European court rules against Italy for expelling migrants


European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) on Thursday ruled that Italy had violated it human rights obligations when it deported a group of African migrants intercepted in the Mediterranean Sea to Libya in 2009. The decision delivered in Strasbourg by 17 judges of the court was described as a 'landmark' by the United Nation's Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and was also welcomed by several rights groups in Italy and elsewhere. Italy's International Cooperation Minister, Andrea Riccardi, said that the ruling would force Italy to 'think and rethink our policies towards migration.' The case concerned 24 Somalis and Eritreans who were in a group of 200 migrants intercepted by the Italian Coast Guard 35 nautical miles from the Italian island of Lampedusa.

Belarus fights Europe to retain death penalty


Belarusian MPs have blasted a recent resolution of the European Parliament on death penalty in Belarus as an attempt to interfere in the country’s internal affairs. The Belarusian parliamentary commission on international affairs has issued an official statement saying that the European Parliament’s resolution on the death penalty in Belarus was a continuation of the practice of pressuring Belarusian authorities and meddling with the country’s internal affairs. Additionally, the Belarusian side noted that from the text of the resolution they could draw a conclusion that the European side did not pay much attention to the credibility of facts and the logic of conclusions. In particular, the Belarusian parliamentarians criticized the fact that the case of Metro bombers Konovalov and Kovalyov, mentioned in the resolution, is called unjust, despite of the fact that the trial in the case was open to the maximum and well-covered by the media. The Belarusian politicians also expressed surprise over the fact that their country was called the Belarusian Federation in the European Parliament’s resolution, while its official name is Republic of Belarus. However, the text of the resolution posted on the European Parliament’s website in English uses the correct name. Belarusian MPs stressed that the use of capital punishment in their country is not against international norms and its use is extremely limited, and in practice happens only in extraordinary cases. The ban on capital punishment is the internal affair of the Republic of Belarus and can only be made with consideration of the Belarusian society’s opinion, the politicians said.

Fishing skippers fined £720,000

 

Seventeen skippers behind one of Scotland's biggest fishing scams have been fined a total of £720,000. The group admitted making illegal landings of mackerel and herring worth £47.5 million between January 1 2002 and March 19 2005. The "black fish" scam, which broke sea fishing laws, was carried out at fish processing factory Shetland Catch in Lerwick, Shetland. Judge Lord Turnbull said the scam is "an episode of shame" for the pelagic fishing industry. He said it was a "cynical and sophisticated" operation which had the "connivance of a number of different interested parties". Hamish Slater, 53, and Alexander Masson, 66, both from Fraserburgh, were fined a respective £80,000 and £50,000, while Alexander Wiseman, 60, from Banff, was also fined £50,000. Another 13 men from Shetland were fined for their role in the scam. Robert Polson, 48, was fined £70,000; John Irvine, 68, was fined £80,000; William Williamson, 65, was fined £45,000; Laurence Irvine, 66, was fined £80,000; and David Hutchison, 66, was fined £40,000, as was 56-year-old Thomas Eunson. Both Allister Irvine, 63, and Gary Williamson, 52, were fined £35,000; and George Henry, 60, was fined £12,000. John Stewart, 57, was ordered to pay £15,000, while George Anderson, 56, must pay £12,000. Colin Leask, 39, and Allen Anderson, 55, were each fined £3,000 A £70,000 fine was imposed on Victor Buchini, 51, from Poulton-le-Fylde in Lancashire. The company Alexander Buchan was fined £240,000 for helping the vessel masters land the undeclared fish. The pelagic fishermen, who committed the offences to evade the annual EU fishing quota, had already been ordered to hand over almost £3 million in confiscation orders at a previous court hearing. The convictions came as the result of a seven-year investigation, Operation Trawler, after the Scottish Fisheries Protection Agency (SFPA), now Marine Scotland, became suspicious about widespread illegal landing of fish within the pelagic fleet. Pelagic fish are those which swim near the water's surface. Auditors KPMG reviewed Shetland Catch and found that between January 1 2002 and March 28 2004, the company's earnings were not supported by its declared landings. The company premises were searched on September 27 2005 and officials found that scales used to weigh fish coming into the factory had been manipulated to provide false weights. Management were able to input fake wastage figures into a computer in the main factory, accessible to inspectors from the SFPA, which would be deducted from the actual weight shown on the screen. The proper weight was displayed on screens in the engineer's room and in a loft area, both of which were off-limits to SFPA officials. The computer in the loft area was where the weight manipulation took place. It could be accessed remotely by two members of staff, a fish buyer and the then assisting managing director, using a username and password, allowing them to program it to provide false weights. Lord Turnbull said the proceedings brought "embarrassment and shame" to the skippers and their families. He said: "All of the accused who appear today have spent their working lives as productive and hard-working members of our community. Barring other regulatory infringements, not a single one has ever come into any conflict with the law. "It was not surprising therefore to hear of the well-respected positions within their communities which many held and of the embarrassment and shame which these proceedings have brought to them personally and to their families." The judge said the fishing industry "makes a crucial contribution" to the well-being of many communities and to the economy of the country as a whole. He added: "There would of course be no fishing industry were it not for the willingness of fishermen to go to sea. It is correct to acknowledge that in doing so,fishermen require to cope with challenging circumstances of isolation from family members and often with dangerous and frightening weather conditions, the likes of which will be wholly unfamiliar to others with more conventional working environments. "Over the history of the fishing industry and even in recent times in Scotland, tragedy has often visited the families of those who spend their working lives at sea." The judge also noted that each master involved "made no attempt" to disguise their true income from the fish and paid income tax on both the declared and undeclared landings. But he said the men had all participated in "a deliberate and calculated determination to evade the quota levels for fishing available to each vessel" for "purely financial" reasons. He said: "The system through which this was achieved was both cynical and sophisticated and involved the connivance of a number of different interested parties, some of whom have benefited but have not been prosecuted. "The extent to which landings of fish were deliberately under-declared was at times truly staggering and in the case of some of the accused concerned, took place continuously over a three-year period. "What I found to be noteworthy was that no understandable explanation was provided on behalf of any the vessel masters as to why this practice was commenced or continued with. "No one for example appears to have engaged in this exercise on account of struggling to cope financially with the costs of continued fishing within the quota levels allocated. "Indeed, in contrast to some within the fishing industry, those engaged in fishing with the pelagic fleet appear to have been able to make very substantial sums over many years, providing very comfortable livings for themselves and their families. "In short then, and as was conceded by at least some of those who appeared before me, the motivation for the sustained furnishing of false information was purely financial. Those who were already making a good living saw this as a way in which more income could be generated. "No doubt the fact that so many were involved lent a veneer of acceptability to the conduct but there is another side to that as well: the fact that so many were prepared to participate in deliberate lies and falsehood means that the desire for financial benefit was able to overshadow the instincts of fairness, truthfulness and responsibility which will have influenced every other aspect of the lives of those concerned and which values they would expect to see others, including their own family members, abide by. "The result is an episode of shame for much of the whole pelagic fishing industry. "I have however accepted in each case that these proceedings have been responded to responsibly and that those concerned regret their involvement and the embarrassment which has been brought to them personally and to their families." The men had previously been subjected to a reduced quota of fish to "balance out" the environmental effect of years of overfishing. But the judge insisted that this was not a punishment but an "exercise in conservation". He said: "I do not accept that the accused in this case have lost out or have been made worse off as a consequence of these arrangements. I accept as accurate the observation that looking back with hindsight had they never over-fished at all then they would have achieved a greater income over the extended period than they in fact have. "That is due to the massive increase in the prices obtained for the type of fish with which I am concerned in the period since 2002. That however is no more than an irony of the situation. It does not reflect any actual loss to those concerned. In fact, as a consequence of the increased value of the fish, those involved have still been able to generate very substantial incomes, despite being restricted to catching a smaller quantity. "If the current prices remain stable then when the quota deduction arrangements have been exhausted, they will be in a position to increase that income even further." He also referred to "activities of foreign fishing vessels" in exceeding fishing quotas. The judge said: "If there is an imbalance in the approach of the relevant authorities within the European Union, that is a matter for the relevant ministers to raise with their counterparts. "If vessels belonging to states outwith the European Union are thought to enjoy some inappropriate benefit or are not thought to be complying with their responsibilities concerning stock conservation, that is a matter to be addressed at governmental or international level. "I am dealing with the contravention of a law of this country which was introduced to ensure compliance with the international obligation which the United Kingdom had entered into. "I am entitled to treat that contravention as a serious matter regardless of how it might be thought that similar conduct would be or has been responded to elsewhere." Three more fishermen pleaded guilty today in a separate case but which was part of the same investigation. James Smith, 54, from Fraserburgh, John Smith, 36, from Peterhead and Stephen Bellamy, 59, from Fraserburgh all admitted landing undeclared fish at Fresh Catch in Peterhead and at Shetland Catch in Lerwick. Sentencing was deferred to May 18. An inspection in November 2005 at the Alexander Buchan firm detected an unofficial weigh belt fitted with "load cells" to the conveyor belt system at the point where fish entered the factory. The cells are used to detect the weight of fish passing over the belt. A deflector plate had been used on the unofficial weigh belt, allowing the fish to drop off part of the way along the official scales. As the fish did not travel over the full area, a lower weight was achieved on the counter. This method is said to have allowed up to 70% of a total landing to go unrecorded. Alexander Buchan, which is no longer trading, has already been ordered to pay £165,000 in a confiscation order. A third fish processing factory, Fresh Catch, also admitted helping vessel masters land undeclared fish between October 20 2002 and September 2 2005 at its premises in Kirk Square near Peterhead. Skippers Ernest Simpson, 64, from Fraserburgh, Allan Simpson, 42, from Fraserburgh, and Oswald McRonald, 63, from Banff, pleaded guilty at the High Court in Glasgow today to landing undeclared fish at the factory. Their sentences were also deferred until May 18. Fresh Catch was audited by KPMG during the same period as Shetland Catch and it too was found to have earnings unsupported by official landing figures. At the factory, fish entered via a delivery pipe which went up and over the building. However, a search of the premises in September 2005 uncovered a purpose-built pipe, leading underground, was also connected. This second pipe bypassed the official weigh scale. Knife valves were used to divert the fish when they came to a T-junction, allowing fish to be sent to another part of the factory and was never weighed or officially accounted for. In 2005 the two valves become remote controlled and the direction the fish took at the junction depended on which one was open or closed. Fresh Catch only became significantly operational at around the time the scam began. Cephas Ralph, head of compliance at Marine Scotland, said the divert pipe "certainly served no other purpose" and that "it wasn't put there by accident". All three factories were prosecuted out of Operation Trawler which started in 2005. However, nothing suggested any of the plants were linked. At the time of the undeclared landings, Shetland Catch was the largest pelagic fish processing operator in Scotland and one of the largest in Europe. It was able to process and freeze up to 1,000 tonnes of fish a day. EU regulations state that when a vessel reaches its quota, it has the option to either stop fishing or to buy some of another vessel's quota which has not yet been reached. Any vessel which exceeds its quota faces disciplinary action. When the investigation started 26 vessels were in the pelagic fleet, with eight pelagic fish processing factories. More than half (15) of those boats have been prosecuted. Mr Ralph said the investigation had an immediate effect on the entire industry and that Marine Scotland is now satisfied that legislation is in place to ensure a similar scam does not happen again. He said: "Since 2005 we detected a change which spilled out beyond the pelagic industry. It is more important to the vessels to have a good reputation. "It is fair to say we are satisfied that we have inspection procedures, legislation, a mindset in place in the industry that means if such activity was to recommence, it would be quickly detected and dealt with. "We have not had anything similar since these cases and all our intelligence suggests that no similar activities are taking place." Afterwards Lindsey Miller, head of the serious and organised crime division of the Crown Office, said: "Organised crime takes many forms. These individuals may not have been involved in drug dealing or prostitution but let us make no mistake that they were involved in significant and serious organised criminality." She added: "The legislation is there to protect the marine environment for the good of all and to safeguard the future of the fishing industry. These men disregarded it for their own financial gain and, in a clear example of successful working between the law enforcement agencies involved, have now been brought to justice and made to pay for their crimes." The police investigation was led by Detective Superintendent Gordon Gibson of Grampian Police who said the scale of the crime is of "a level rarely seen before". The men involved "amassed huge sums of money through their own greed and today this caught up with them in a court of law", he added. Meanwhile, Cephas Ralph said: "Today's successful court activity is an outcome that reflects the professionalism, dedication and commitment shown by all of the Marine Scotland staff who have been involved in this inquiry. "It has not been an easy task but they have worked tirelessly to help secure the convictions obtained in these important cases." Scottish Environment Secretary Richard Lochhead paid tribute to the police and Marine Scotland for their efforts in "a long and vastly complicated inquiry". He said: "There is no doubt that these illegal activities are a stark and shameful reminder of the culture that existed in some sectors of the fishing industry in past years. But they do not reflect the much-improved culture we see today. "The offences date back up to a decade ago and thankfully there has been seismic change in the attitude and behaviour of the fishing fleet, which can only be good thing in securing a viable future for the industry in Scotland." He also said: "There have been significant advances in recent years in how fish landings are monitored and controlled, including comprehensive audits and certified weighing systems." Dr Mireille Thom, senior marine policy officer at WWF Scotland, said ignoring quotas "isn't a victim-less offence" because "such landings not only undermine the conservation of fish stocks and the fortune of the fleets that fish them, they also distort competition by depressing fish prices. In short, they threaten the public good for the benefit of a few".

Police uncover 'serious and organised' criminality in £63m scam to breach European fishing quotas

An inquiry into the UK's largest fishing scandal has uncovered "serious and organised" criminality by Scottish trawlermen and fish processors in an elaborate scam to illegally sell nearly £63m of undeclared fish.

Three large fish factories and 27 skippers have pleaded guilty to sophisticated and lucrative schemes to breach EU fishing quotas, in what one senior police officer described as "industrial level" deception.

They went to extraordinary lengths to conceal their illegally caught fish, installing underground pipelines, secret weighing machines and extra conveyor belts and computers to allow them to land 170,000 tonnes above their EU quota of mackerel and herring between 2002 and 2005.

The extent of the "black landings" scandal emerged as 17 skippers and one of the three factories were given fines totalling nearly £1m at the high court in Glasgow on Friday, after admitting repeated breaches of the Sea Fishing (Enforcement of Community Control Measures) (Scotland) Order 2000. Another six skippers pleaded guilty at the same hearing to landing undeclared fish worth nearly £7m at Lerwick, in the Shetlands, and Peterhead, Aberdeenshire.

Four skippers pleaded guilty in January and a further four in the ring, who can't be named for legal reasons, are still to be prosecuted.

Judge Lord Turnbull, told the 17 skippers sentenced on Friday they were guilty of a "cynical and sophisticated" operation, which brought embarrassment and shameon them and their families. "The motivation was purely financial," he said. "Those who were already making a good living saw this as a way more income could be generated and were prepared to participate in deliberate lies and falsehoods."

Once the illegally caught fish had been sneaked past Government inspectors, it was put on sale in the Lerwick and Peterhead markets, where it was sold to wholesalers and fishmongers as if it had been legally landed, in defiance of strict EU regulations designed to protectEurope's fish stocks from over-fishing.

The Guardian can reveal that the illegally landed fish was sold with the knowledge of the government-funded industry marketing authority Seafish, which took a £2.58 levy for every tonne of over-quota mackerel and herring. That earned it £434,000 in fees before the Scottish Fisheries Protection Agency, now part of Marine Scotland, raided two factories in September 2005.

The headquarters of Seafish in Edinburgh were raided by police and documents seized in 2008, but five months later prosecutors decided not to take any further action. It is thought the Crown Office, the Scottish prosecution body, believed there was no evidence that could lead to the agency being accused of involvement in the scam.

With a series of court cases stretching back to 2010, the scandal has implicated more than half the Scottish mackerel and herring fleet active at that time. It is understood that the true value of the illegal landings linked to the factories involved is closer to £100m, but prosecutors decided to pursue just £63m of landings.

Black fish factory graphicHow one Peterhead factory sidestepped the rules. Source: Guardian graphics

Prosecutors have also confiscated £3.1m from 17 skippers who landed catches in Lerwick, and against two of the three firms so far convicted, under proceedings of crime legislation introduced to tackle serious criminal gangs and drugs lords. The largest confiscation order, £425,9000, was against Hamish Slater, the skipper of the trawler Enterprise from Fraserburgh, Aberdeenshire, who admitted landing £3,980,000 worth of undeclared fish. A number of skippers landed fish worth more than £2m.

At Shetland Catch in Lerwick, one of Europe's largest fish processors, the company installed a duplicate conveyor belt when its new factory was built, fitting a secret weight-reading device in the loft and a computer in an engineer's workshop "a considerable distance" from the factory floor.

In its processing plant at Peterhead, north of Aberdeen, Fresh Catch installed an underground pipe to divert fish to secret weighing devices, which used remotely operated pneumatic valves. It built a secret storage room, and operated the clandestine machinery from a hut known to workers as the Wendy House, disguised with fake "Danger: high voltage" signs on its door.

A second factory in the town, Alexander Buchan, which has since closed, fitted a secret scale and conveyor belt, which allowed up to 70% of a boat's catch to go undeclared. It printed a guidance manual showing its staff how to handle undeclared landings, and its staff misled trading standards officers about its purpose.

Detective Superintendent Gordon Gibson, of Grampian police, the senior investigating officer in Operation Trawler, said: "Make no bones about it: it was serious, it was organised and it was criminal. The element of preparation involved was significant, given the methods and means that all these individuals went to.

"Was I surprised? Absolutely. I was surprised at the levels they had gone to disguise their criminal conduct."

An industry source admitted: "This wasn't casual or by accident. It was organised, it was systematic, it was deception. No one disagrees with that."

In a further penalty, which is thought to have cost the convicted skippers millions, the European commission cut the quotas soon after the scandal was reported to Brussels by the UK government in 2005, calling it a "quota payback".

Although none of the trawlermen have been banned from fishing, their quotas were cut by more than 116,000 tonnes of mackerel and nearly 47,000 tonnes of herring over a seven-year period. That payback will end next year.

One source with detailed knowledge of the case said this had damaging consequences for skippers and crews involved, as the market value of mackerel and herring since 2005 had been as much as double the price 10 years ago.

The convictions follow a complex, 10-year investigation involving forensic accountants from KPMG, who analysed the paperwork for thousands of landings, a core team of 25 detectives and support staff from Grampian and Northern police, four British sea fishery officers with Marine Scotland, the Home Office Holmes police computer system, money laundering experts with the Scottish Crime and Drug Enforcement Agency, and specialist prosecutors at the Crown Office.

Operation Trawler has brought to an end a practice which was once endemic in the British fishing industry, but has been made extremely difficult by hi-tech monitoring and tracking of every registered trawler at sea, and much tighter controls on landings at processing firms.

The skippers and firms involved have refused to discuss their convictions; Shetland Catch is still facing confiscation proceedings. But sources with detailed knowledge of the scandal have admitted the practice was widespread within the pelagic fishing industry. Lawyers for one of the convicted men, George Anderson, 55, from Whalsay, Shetland, claimed this year that he evaded the controls because he believed that discarding under-sized fish was "repugnant".

"Black landings" are still common practice across the EU, and prosecutions still take place. In Lerwick and Peterhead, some insist that the undeclared landings, which helped many of the skippers and their crews enjoy comparatively luxurious lifestyles, were well-known within the industry and among regulators.

Asked about its knowledge of the illegal landings, Seafish told the Guardian it was legally required to take the levy, and insisted it had tipped off the authorities to the over-quota landings. However, one source said that the issue was discussed in board meetings, "but the Seafish line was that we weren't a fishery protection agency, our job was to take a levy on every tonne landed."

He added: "They were totally aware they were getting a levy on quota and over-quota fish."

The source denied it was serious and organised crime: the skippers involved paid income tax and business taxes alongside the Seafish levy on all their illegal landings, largely because the over-quota fish was sold in the fish markets as if it were legally declared. Fraud charges were dropped by prosecutors at an early stage, he said.

But he added: "There is nobody defending this. It was morally wrong; it was ecologically wrong and sustainably wrong. There is no excuse.

"A lot of the skippers are saying, 'What we did wasn't right; it was wrong. We really want to draw a line under this and move forward.'"

He said the scandal had the effect of transforming Scotland's pelagic fishing industry into one of the most sustainable in the world: after the raids, the mackerel and herring fleet introduced very strict monitoring and quota management. Since 2008, its fisheries have won a prized Marine Stewardship Council eco-label, and are now the largest in Europe with MSC certification.

But the "black landings" scandal is coming back to haunt the industry. It is expected to lose its MSC accreditation later this year after a bitter dispute with the Faroe Islands and Iceland: both countries have claimed much larger mackerel quotas than is sustainable for the north-east Atlantic stocks, in breach of MSC rules. The Faroese in particular believe the over-quota prosecutions puts the Scottish industry's credibility in severe doubt.

"It's not a proud moment for what is a very proud industry," one senior figure conceded.

Richard Lochhead, the Scottish agriculture secretary, said the convicted were guilty of appalling behaviour. "These illegal activities are a stark and shameful reminder of the culture that existed in some sectors of the fishing industry in past years," he said.

"Thankfully, there has been seismic change in the attitude and behaviour of the fishing fleet, which can only be good thing in securing a viable future for the industry."

Dr Mireille Thom, a senior marine policy officer for the conservation group WWF Scotland, said: "Deliberately ignoring quota rules by landing 'black fish' isn't a victimless offence. Such landings not only undermine the conservation of fish stocks and the fortune of the fleets that fish them, they also distort competition by depressing fish prices. In short, they threaten the public good for the benefit of a few."

A glamorous French politician is set to become France’s first ever ‘MP for Britain’ to represent more than 100,000 Gallic expats living in the UK.

A glamorous French politician is set to become France’s first ever ‘MP for Britain’ to represent more than 100,000 Gallic expats living in the UK.

Emmanuelle Savarit, 39, is leading the race to be elected to France’s newest overseas constituency - based in London’s well-heeled Kensington.

The member of Nicolas Sarkozy’s conservative UMP party is the clear frontrunner among five hopefuls vying for the seat of northern Europe.

Hopeful: Emmanuelle Savarit, 39, is leading the race to be elected to France¿s newest overseas constituency - based in London¿s well-heeled Kensington

Hopeful: Emmanuelle Savarit, 39, is leading the race to be elected to France's newest overseas constituency - based in London's well-heeled Kensington

The radical plans to create 11 foreign constituencies to represent French abroad were approved by the Paris parliament three years ago.

 

 

Britain is part of the northern Europe constituency, which also includes the Irish Republic, Scandinavia and the Baltic states.

But within the new seat, 113,655 French voters are registered in the UK, compared with 27,076 in all the other countries put together.

Divorced mother-of-two Ms Savarit’s main rival is equally glamorous 36-year-old socialist Axelle Lemaire, a London-based lawyer.

Competition: Divorced mother-of-two Ms Savarit¿s main rival is 36-year-old socialist Axelle Lemaire, a London-based lawyer

Competition: Divorced mother-of-two Ms Savarit's main rival is 36-year-old socialist Axelle Lemaire, a London-based lawyer

But the French media predict the right-winger’s victory will be ensured by wealthy expats based mainly in west London when the first election takes place in June.

Ms Savarit, who has a doctorate in Psychology, describes herself
on her campaign website as ‘a tough cookie’, but adds: 'That’s not necessarily a fault when you’re in politics.'

The new foreign constituencies are the brainchild of former French interior affairs minister Alain Marlaix.

Vital: The importance of the French expat vote was highlighted when President Sarkozy came to London to give a speech to thousands of French voters ahead of his 2007 election campaign

Vital: The importance of the French expat vote was highlighted when President Sarkozy came to London to give a speech to thousands of French voters ahead of his 2007 election campaign

He said: 'This is the first time in any country in the world that something like this had been done.

'The new overseas MPs will have identical status to any other MP based in France, and vote in parliament in Paris.

'They will be elected in the same way and speak for the French expatriates they represent.'

Government advisor Herve Fabre-Aubrespy, who is overseeing the new constituencies, said: 'It is a challenge for us, because nothing similar has ever been done anywhere.

'No one has carved the world up into constituencies in this way.'

The new constituencies are part of a larger parliamentary shake-up, with seats being merged or enlarged across France so that the total number of 577 MPs still remains the same.

The importance of the French expat vote was highlighted when President Sarkozy came to London to give a speech to thousands of French voters ahead of his 2007 election campaign.

But French socialists have claimed the new overseas seats are ‘closet gerrymandering’ - where constituencies are created to the benefit of the ruling party.

A socialists’ spokesman said: 'Studies show French people living abroad are more likely to vote for a centre-right party than a left wing one.
'This is being proposed as something that is good for French expatriates, but in fact it is just a way for the government to give itself another 11 safe seats.'

Six of the 11 new constituencies will be in Europe, but others are based in Canada and the US, central and South America, the Middle East, Arica and Asia, representing more than million French people living abroad.



Teenager stabbed in the street in Redhill

 

STREET was sent into lockdown after a boy was stabbed in a confrontation with a ten-strong gang. A trail of blood was visible up a 100-metre stretch of Ladbroke Road, Redhill, after the 17-year-old was knifed in the wrist on Wednesday, February 15. ​ A 17-year-old was stabbed in the wrist in Ladbroke Road in Redhill • • Some residents were ordered to stay inside all evening as police closed the road to traffic and pedestrians. One woman, who asked not to be named for fear of reprisals, said: "We heard shouting and people running back and forth, I looked out and this lad was saying 'I've been stabbed'. "He was on his phone and ran off up the road." She said a kitchen knife, with a blade about five or six inches long, was later recovered. She added: "With the park [Memorial Park] over the road, there is lots of trouble. It is a nightmare up and down here. "A stabbing is a one-off but the trouble isn't – I'm not really shocked." Other neighbours agreed that the incident was not a surprise, and said drug dealing and disturbances were a regular occurrence in the area. The victim and two friends were walking along the road at about 7.15pm when they were approached by a gang of ten people. He was stabbed in the wrist with what police said they "believed" was a knife. Appealing for witnesses, investigating officer Detective Constable Darryl Donaghue, said: "Several lines of enquiry are being followed to catch those responsible. "Ladbroke Road is a popular cut-through for commuters leaving Redhill Railway Station and is generally a busy area. I would appeal to anyone who was in the vicinity at the time of the incident to contact us if they can in any way help with the investigation." Reigate and Banstead neighbourhood inspector Richard Haycock added: "Additional patrols will be put on to reassure members of the public who use this area." The attackers are described as boys and men aged between 16 and 20 and of various ethnic origins. Two girls nearby may also be connected to the incident. A "number of items" seized at the scene are being analysed. The victim was treated by ambulance crews at the scene and taken to hospital.

One in seven Cambridge students 'has sold drugs to help pay their way through university'

 

One in seven Cambridge students is  dealing drugs to help pay their way through university, according to a survey. It found many claim that they have been forced to sell illegal substances to friends to make ends meet as they study. And it revealed nearly two-thirds admitted taking drugs, with cannabis the most  popular substance.

Friday, 24 February 2012

MP Eric Joyce charged with assault


MP Eric Joyce has been charged with three counts of common assault after a disturbance at a House of Commons bar. The MP for Falkirk, who has been suspended by the Parliamentary Labour Party, was arrested on Wednesday evening after police were called. Mr Joyce, 51, of Bo'ness, near Falkirk, has been bailed and will appear at West London Magistrates' Court on 7 March. The allegations relate to Conservative MP for Pudsey, Stuart Andrew, a second Tory MP and a Labour whip. Mr Andrew had been in the bar on Wednesday following a Commons event organised by his Conservative colleague MP Andrew Percy, for the Speaker of the Canadian Parliament. Having spent nearly 24 hours in custody, Mr Joyce was seen being driven away from the rear of Belgravia police station, in central London, late on Thursday after being charged. Warning to MPs The BBC understands officers involved in the investigation returned to the Commons on Thursday evening to interview eyewitnesses. The allegations relate to a disturbance in the Strangers Bar, which is reserved for MPs and their guests. Mr Bercow told MPs after Mr Joyce was arrested: "I take this matter very seriously, as do the House authorities. "I would ask that no further reference should be made to these reports in the Chamber." Mr Joyce, a former Army major, was elected in a by-election in December 2000 and has served as a parliamentary private secretary (PPS) to a number of government ministers since 2003. He was PPS to the then defence secretary Bob Ainsworth until 2009, and prior to that had been a parliamentary aide to John Hutton, Mike O'Brien and Margaret Hodge.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

MUSEUM OF LONDON

Pageviews from the past week

SHALE GAS

INTERNET AND AGE UK

Popular CRIME POSTS

BREAKING CRIME NEWS

Search This Blog

Breaking Blog News

Blog Archive

Border Watch

Labels

22 (4) 40 (4) 25 (3) 28 (3) 29 (3) 32 (3) 34 (3) 39 (3) 43 (3) Boy (3) 21 (2) 26 (2) 36 (2) 41 (2) 46 (2) 65 (2) Arran Coghlan (2) Cheshire (2) David Lloyd (2) Liverpool (2) Mauritius honeymoon murder: Michaela McAreavey found dumped in bath (2) Nicky Ayers (2) Rupert Ross (2) cocaine (2) drugs were found hidden inside a children's novelty egg. (2) north London (2) south London (2) ''Aldhouse (1) '24/7 Sobriety Program' forces problem drinkers to take - and pay for - twice-daily breath tests to prove they are sober (1) 'Big Brother' state."Police admit keeping records on people who report crimes (1) 'Don't snitch' flyers came from a disgruntled murder witness (1) 'Dublin kingmaker' Gerry Adams (1) 'Evil' Wilbert Dyce convicted of 1982 triple murder (1) 'Grampian Police will continue to take positive action to tackle those involved in the supply of controlled drugs in the area (1) 'Guys are queuing up for one of his guns and he's doing a roaring trade because they're so cheap. (1) 'It would be naive to think that this issue is confined to Pakistan." (1) 'Mr Meticulous' Danny Speed told to expect long prison sentence for £2m bank raids (1) 'Satan's slaves' in pub attack (1) 'Street Gangs' Riot At Young Offenders Unit (1) 'Taxi firm' crime gangs targeted (1) 'Until you forgive (1) 'headed a highly organised and experienced crime group' which sold class A and B drugs in north England. (1) 000 cocaine seized in Inverness (1) 000 seized in police raids (1) 000 women alleged they had been raped (1) 000 worth of suspected illegal drugs in the Portstewart area." (1) 10 days in Sweden: the full allegations against Julian Assange (1) 100) has been seized by police in Dublin. (1) 11 quizzed over suspected gang murder: (1) 13 (1) 14 arrests made in drug raids (1) 16 teenagers have been killed in London this year (1) 191 in his possession. (1) 195 sex pests walking the streets. (1) 200kms from Cádiz (1) 23-year-old Mark Noonan and 20-year-old Glenn Murphy - who were cousins - were gunned down on the forecourt of the Tesco petrol station in Finglas. (1) 26-year jail term from drug smuggling mastermind (1) 30 (1) 38 (1) 40 arrests after trade crime crackdown (1) 448 (1) 47-year-old driver Christopher Cummins was 'unwilling or unable' to explain the £200 (1) 51 (1) 54 (1) 59 (1) 6 arrests after East Lancashire night slashing (1) 61-year-old Richard Kemp (1) 668 within three months. (1) 68 (1) : Boy remanded over girl's murder (1) : Teenager denies builder's yard murder (1) :: Prisoner who ran a £14m drug ring on ‘day release’ (1) A jealous husband who arranged for his wife to be hacked to death in west London (1) Abdullah Baybasin was described as one of the most dangerous drug dealers in Europe after he was jailed for 22 years in 2006. (1) Accused executed victim he thought was gang rival (1) Aiden McPartland (1) Alexander McQueen (1) Alexander Trenchard (1) Alistair Kennedy (1) All that prevents more shootings is a shortage of bullets (1) Alleged U.S. Smuggler Sold Guns to U.K. Gangs (1) Anfield (1) Angus (1) Anni (1) Anni Dewani murder: friends of bride urge husband to return to South Africa (1) Anni and her tycoon husband (1) Apprentice Stella to marry ‘gang link’ scaffolder (1) Apprentice's Christopher Farrell off 'to fight pirates' after escaping jail (1) Arrests Follow 500K Drug Seizure (1) Arrests after drug blitz (1) Arrests after police witness 'drug deal' in Berkshire (1) Arrests in Belfast and Preston over importation of guns (1) Arrests in Rooney 'baby photo blackmail plot (1) Ayers was killed by a gunman who shot him at least three times in South Cantril Avenue (1) BRITAIN’S biggest benefit fraudsters who milked the system of more than £1million were last night named and shamed. (1) Barry Haydon (1) Belfast and Lisburn arrests over drugs and money laundering: (1) Beware the frost-jackers.Prowling gangs target motorists as they leave engines running (1) Blade-blighted Glasgow (1) Blue Volvo and ‘higher level’ criminality possible leads in Widnes man murder investigation (1) Body found in river feared to be that of missing mother-of-two Gillian Merrick (1) Body of murdered solicitor found in car (1) Bogdan 'Tony' Paduret (1) Bolton’s Divisional Organised Crime Unit (1) Bomb expert 'tried to murder wife' (1) Border Agency arrests two workers in Nottingham (1) Boxer Leigh Clift charged with murder as man stabbed dies 9 years after attack (1) Bradford and Croydon (1) Britain pledged millions to lawless Somali region linked to pirate gangs (1) British government intervenes to help expats caught in Spanish property scams (1) British jails are failing to investigate serious allegations of male rape (1) British lord found guilty of expense fraud (1) British security guard Danny Fitzsimons denies double murder in Iraq (1) Briton Khuram Antonio Khan Garcia (1) Briton's killers lose murder appeal (1) Bulgarian man has appeared in court accused of the murder of Fife businessman Mohammed Nadeem Siddique. (1) Burford (1) Businessman shot five times in gang murder bid (1) Butcher who slit love rival's throat guilty of murder (1) CCTV image released in Liverpool murder inquiry: (1) CPS dropped the murder charge against him after sources said they could not prove Coghlan did not act in self defence (1) CS gas sprays and guns are slowly replacing knives as the weapon of choice for the town’s criminals. (1) Cage fighter Lee Murray was unsuccessful in an appeal against his 10-year jail sentence during a hearing in Rabat on Tuesday (1) Call for probe after £259k fraud gangster avoids jail (1) Call of Duty (1) Car ploughs into nightclub crowd in Rochdale (1) Car-crime network smashed as gang are jailed (1) Cash for gold boom 'boosts crime' (1) Castle Street gang (1) Chatham (1) Chesterton Road (1) Child killer 'murdered' at maximum security prison (1) Children at risk as gangs use innocent neighbours' gardens to stash drugs (1) Chinese gang behind a massive smuggling operation in which bedsits in Glasgow are being used as factories to repackage raw tobacco and sell it as commercial brands. (1) Claims of MI5 link to Real IRA murder investigated (1) Cleveland Police spokeswoman said the consequences of methadone misuse could be 'extremely harmful' (1) Cleveland Police's Serious Organised Crime unit (1) Clifton residents told killer may be in their midst (1) Co Antrim man held in UK-wide SOCA probe (1) Cocaine with an estimated street value of 1m euro (£843 (1) Colchester (1) Coleen Rooney ready to give court evidence on blackmail plot over pictures of Kai (1) Colin Howell thought of murder as he held cable over wife in bath (1) Colombia-UK drug smuggling network busted (1) Cops probing murder of honeymoon wife to ask husband Shrien if he is gay (1) Cops seize £1m in drugs cash (1) Cornwall (1) Counter-terrorism officials launched a major operation over fears of multiple bomb attacks in Whitehall (1) Craigavon: (1) Cricket's match-fixing crisis has taken a sinister twist after Pakistan wicketkeeper Zulqarnain Haider fled to London (1) Cumbrian fraud man bids to overturn £7 million payback order (1) Cumbrian restaurant workers to be thrown out of UK after raids (1) Curtis Warren is to take his fight against his conviction for a £1m cannabis plot in Jersey to the highest court in the UK. (1) Customs officers 'told not to look for smugglers at Heathrow (1) Customs officials at Heathrow ignore drug smugglers (1) DETECTIVES investigating the murder of Joanna Yeates have called in the team of forensic experts that helped catch the killer of Rachel Nickell (1) Dane Bowers is arrested over alleged drug dealing at cage-fighting events (1) Danny Fitzsimons (1) Dartford and Canterbury (1) Dead MI6 worker visited bondage sites (1) Decks cleared for Dewani`s extradition to SA over wife`s murder conspiracy: (1) Delay in Briton's Iraq murder tria (1) Dentist Colin Howell admits double murder treated as suicide pact for 20 years (1) Detectives are investigating up to a dozen nurseries in the west of Scotland believed to be linked with gangsters (1) Detectives arrest two and make car appeal over Boxing Day shooting (1) Detectives have been granted another 36 hours to question a man who was arrested yesterday on suspicion of murder. (1) Detectives looking into the death are expected to examine at least one threatening message placed on website Bebo. (1) Dior suspends John Galliano after arrest for street abuse (1) Diplomatic investigation is under way after former world boxing featherweight champion Scott Harrison’s bid to be transferred from a Spanish jail to Barlinnie Prison in Glasgow was halted. (1) Dozens arrested after police anti-drugs raids across Sussex (1) Dozens arrested in drug and gang operation in Sheffield (1) Dr Colin Howell (1) Drug gang king pin jailed over 22 tonnes of cocaine and cannabis (1) Drug gangs in England exporting gun culture to Wales (1) Drug gangs target cruise ships (1) Drug-dealer jailed for Redhill flat murder (1) Drug-smuggling former prison officer loses appeal against sentence (1) Drugs seized and 15 arrests in Merseyside Police raids (1) Drugs worth £500 (1) Dundee (1) Durham city undercover cop (1) East Dulwich bus murder victim 'stabbed 24 times' (1) East Kilbride (1) EastEnders actor bragged on Celebrity Mastermind about committing crime (1) Eddie Boyd will never walk again after the bungled gangland hit in his home (1) Eddie Lyons has been given his first ever court sentence (1) Edward Pybis (1) Eight bales of the drug were thrown overboard (1) Eighth arrest in Limerick murder inquiry (1) Elite crime unit's database of one million suspects 'breaks the law' (1) Elizabeth Veysey went into the jail with cannabis resin hidden under her skirt (1) Emmanuel Ganpot (1) EuroMillions winners 'terrified of being kidnapped' (1) Ex-United man Wallwork arrested (1) Ex-club owner Gary Robb finally admits guilt: (1) Ex-soldier found guilty of trying to murder wife with grenade (1) Ex-undercover Pc Mark Kennedy 'living in fear': (1) Expenses MPs must face trial (1) Eynsham (1) Farmers are claiming that the British and Americans are responsible for the outbreak of the poppy plague (1) Farmhouse killer Jeremy Bamber faces dying in prison (1) Fazakerley murder victim Joey Cummins survived previous attempt on life in street shotgun attack (1) Fife (1) Finchley (1) Five arrested in Leicester over 'violent' gem raids (1) Five guilty of Lincoln man's killing (1) Five held over Michaela McAreavey murder denied bail (1) Flint Mountain. (1) Ford prison riot adds to chequered history (1) Forfar man Christopher McIntosh jailed over heroin trafficking (1) Four Sussex men suspected of attempted murder after pub brawl (1) Four arrested as police raid wedding ceremony (1) Four in court over teenage footballer's murder (1) Four men arrested on suspicion of murder (1) Four men jailed over Manchester street stabbing murder (1) France (1) Fraud prevention detectives have today (1) Gallaghers' dad gets cop warning (1) Galo Bemudez (1) Gang caught loading van with 100kgs of heroin (1) Gang shootings and fights ‘commonplace’ (1) Gang war results in one death and five injured on the streets of Folkestone (1) Gangs of muggers stole thousands from student protesters (1) Gardai arrest 45 people over drug trafficking (1) Gardaí continue to quiz three over weapons (1) Garry Waring (1) Gipsy Hill murder: Six jailed for shooting 'peacemaker' (1) Girl (1) Gorleston (1) Great Yarmouth (1) Gun gangs targeted in police swoops (1) Gunman jailed for attempted murder in Bolton (1) Gunmen Christopher Bailiff (1) Gypsy gangs train five-year-olds to pickpocket on the streets of Britain (1) Harold Landry murder trial: (1) Hate crime figures paint a grim portrait of life in Britain (1) Hertfordshire Constabulary's ANPR Intercept Team stopped a vehicle travelling on the M11 near Bishop's Stortford (1) Holidaymakers flee Tunisia violence: (1) Honeymoon bride Anni Dewani's text 6 days before murder (1) Honour kill pair jailed (1) Ian Bowrem (1) Ian Griffin (1) Inside the Violent World of Britain’s Street Gangs (1) Jail for truckers in £2.3m drugs and gun smuggling gang (1) Jail increase for £53m Securitas raid matermind (1) Jail threat to Cumbrian gang-fight man (1) James 'Pancake' Taylor (1) Jamie Daniel is thought to be worth £10million (1) Jamie ‘The Iceman’ Stevenson in fight over stress files (1) Jeremy_Bamber (1) Jilted teenager who stabbed Asha Muneer to death facing life in jail (1) Jo Yeates Murder Accused Remanded (1) Jo Yeates murder inquiry: Arrested man still held (1) Jo Yeates murder: Hunt is like a jigsaw with pieces missing (1) Jo Yeates murder: New evidence uncovered (1) Jo Yeates: Accused Back In Court (1) Joanna Brown's husband charged with her murder (1) Joanna Yeates 'may have been strangled with own sock' (1) Joanna Yeates murder suspect Vincent Tabak 'had split with girlfriend (1) Joanna Yeates murder: Mother wants to play Jo in Crimewatch reconstruction | (1) Joanna Yeates murder: Similarities to unsolved murder of Glenis Carruthers in 1974 | Mail Online (1) Joseph Buckley (1) Just one criminal jailed for every 96 crimes (1) KERRY KATONA has been left devastated after her home was raided by thieves (1) Khuram Antonio Khan Garcia (1) Kitted out in body armour (1) Lancashire (1) Lancaster (1) Lance Lewis (1) Latvian man (1) Laurence Henry Shaw (1) Lawrence Taylor Co Ltd are believed to have cold-called investors (1) Layabout son killed parents over hangover row - (1) Lee Wallace (1) Leyland (1) Limerick double murder investigated (1) Lincoln arrests edge police closer to cracking drug syndicate (1) Liquidators to the Weavering Macro Fixed Income hedge fund were appointed in March (1) Liverpool drivers could hold key to solving Eddie Pybis murder (1) Liverpool teenager charged with stabbing murder (1) London fears new wave of gang deaths (1) Lostock Hall (1) Madeleine McCann is in America Private investigator claims (1) Magdalena Januszeska murder suspect arrested in Malton (1) Maidenhead arson murderer jailed for life (1) Man arrested over Bradford prostitute murders (1) Man arrested over murder of exiled Pakistani politician (1) Man bailed over "murder in the mist" killing of Liverpool FC fan Joey Cummins (1) Man released in Louth murder investigation (1) Man shot dead in Liverpool street (1) Mark Woodward (1) Martin Day (1) Matthew Clement (1) Mesut Karakas was under investigation for alleged corruption when he was secretly recorded discussing the kidnap and plot lines from the hit US TV series (1) Michael Caine puts Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan to shame (1) Michaela McAreavey murder accused held in Mauritius Alcatraz (1) Millionaire jailed for ex-wife murder bid (1) Miss Gentle (1) Missing Joanna Yeates: Similarities to Melanie murder are frightening (1) More arrests over Cheltenham iPhone murder (1) More than one murder a week is committed by a thug on bail (1) Murder case extradition ruling due (1) Murder investigation launched as post-mortem reveals Joanna Yeates was strangled (1) Murder probe after street stabbing (1) Mzoli's is in a dangerous area at night (1) NDLEA arrests first drug trafficker in 2011 (1) NRI man sentenced to life for murdering his wife (1) Naked Charles Bronson covered himself in butter (1) Naming of journalists in hacking scandal ordered (1) Napoli gangs attack Liverpool fans (1) New Asian sex slave gang arrests (1) New witness 'saw killers leave murder room' (1) Newly-wed cleared of murder after five months marriage (1) Newlywed Briton's wife killed after armed robbers hijack taxi in South Africa (1) Nightingale Road in Eston and West Dyke Road in Redcar (1) Nikitta Grender murder: Man (1) Nine arrests in York drug raids (1) Norfolk (1) Norwich area (1) Now Ian Huntley throat-slitter is held over prison murder of notorious child sex killer (1) One brother acquitted of Co Laois murder (1) Organised Crime Group sentenced to 39 years (1) POLICE have arrested a man in connection with the killing of Robertsbridge dad Julian Gardner (1) PSNI officer link to Dungannon murder case (1) Pat Finucane murder probe moves steps closer (1) Pentney (1) Pet crematorium owner Emma Bent pocketed cash and dumped pets in ditches (1) Plaistow (1) Police 'determined' to catch killer of Liverpool man (1) Police arrest 22 in Essex and east London drugs raids (1) Police arrest 44 in Gwent day of action (1) Police chief Jim Trotman 'set fire to car and tried to blame lover's husband' (1) Police crime scene officer killed in horror crash (1) Police dismiss link between Bannatyne’s shooting and ‘gangland’ crime (1) Police force plans to axe community officers (1) Police have identified 17 organised crime gangs (1) Police investigate attempted murder after car hits man (1) Police probe as cousin of gangster Stewart 'Speccy' Boyd found dead on woodland path (1) Police searching for the body of Mrs Brown last night sealed off part of Windsor Great Park as her husband was charged with her murder (1) Police shoot gunman dead after West Yorkshire siege (1) Police suspect murder after youth hit by bus (1) Police swoop in Haydock in 'organised crime' crackdown (1) Police want to trace a taxi driver (1) Police want to trace brothers over Salford stabbing (1) Portuguese newspaper Correio da Manha claimed Mr Ross was tortured for 13 days before escaping from his captors in the village of Boliqueime (1) Prison Officers' Association said the violence started after staff tried to breathalyse prisoners. (1) Probe into crash link to Musselbrugh pub manager murder (1) Professor Green (1) Proportionately more criminals in Britain are sentenced for violent and sexual offences than in most other European countries. (1) RAF servicemen jailed for cigarette smuggling scam (1) Racist gang's glass attack raises fears of pub owners (1) Reggie (1) Robert Nairac trial views TV interview with murder accused (1) Royal car attack: Duchess of Cornwall laughs off student protest fees scare (1) SIX MEMBERS of a south London gang have been found guilty of the murder of 22-year-old Ezra Mills. (1) SOCA advises cruise agencies and cruise lines how to recognize signs that passengers might be inclined to smuggle drugs or other contraband (1) Sainsbury's techie jailed for loyalty card scam (1) Sally McGrath death: Arrest number two (1) Scotland pressured to free Megrahi (1) Scotland-based crime gang suspected of trafficking women to work as prostitutes in Belfast was arrested this month (1) Scots drugs gang jailed (1) Scots legal upheaval as 3500 convicts win new appeals (1) Scottish criminals 'only jailed after 40 convictions' (1) Seven arrested over drugs (1) Seven men have been arrested after detectives from the PSNI Organised Crime Branch seized £500 (1) Sex crimes up as 14 (1) Sex swap hip hop diva wanted over Claudia Aderotimi 'butt boost' death (1) Shrien (1) Shrien Dewani 'right to be worried' about handling of Anni Dewani murder case (1) Shrien Dewani Mastermind To Murder Or Paralysed Victim (1) Shrien Dewani says he and his wife (1) Shropshire man accused of triple murder appears in court (1) Sinn Fein (1) Sinn Fein leaders 'knew about bank raid' (1) Six arrests following drug raids in Glossop (1) South Africa honeymoon murder (1) South Africa honeymoon murder accused denied bail (1) South African honeymoon murder claim 'is ludicrous' (1) South African police are on the verge of revealing the motive behind the murder of Anni Dewani (1) South Norwood builder pleads guilty to smuggling cannabis (1) Spanish National Police have intercepted a British registered yacht on the high seas off the Portuguese coast (1) Staff from Browne Mackenzie (1) Stella English is a gangster's moll with a troubled past (1) Steven Purcell quizzed by cops on return (1) Student left dying in street after being stabbed by muggers (1) Suffolk (1) Suitcase death spy was not gay (1) Suspect in murder of British woman to publish writings from fugitive days (1) Swindon; and Anthony Belcher (1) Swindon; received seven years. (1) Teacher in murder quiz was having affair with sex shop girl (1) Teenage robbery gang jailed (1) Teenager stabbed to death in south London (1) Ten Ghanaians on board an Accra-New York flight of Delta Airlines (1) The Base pub in Ashington (1) The Elland Mad Dogs and the Lee Mount Loonies (1) The arrests were related to recent 'distributed denial of service' (DDoS) attacks by an online group calling themselves Anonymous (1) The detective leading a murder investigation after a man was found shot dead in a disused Smethwick factory today refused to rule out a “gangland killing”. (1) The faces of the 10 latest suspected criminals hiding from police on the "Costa del Crime" have been published (1) Three arrested over iPhone murder: (1) Three arrests after ‘massive disturbance’ in Malton (1) Three arrests and £60 (1) Three arrests over west Belfast pipe bombings (1) Tom Murphy is not a criminal. He’s a good republican (1) Travelodge in Kingston Raid on hotel results in five arrests (1) Trial of British climate protesters collapses (1) Trio in court over honeymoon murder (1) Tuesday 25 January (1) Twenty arrests over suspected £50m beer and wine fraud (1) Two Scots wanted in connection with unsolved murders are believed to be hiding out in Spain. (1) Two Sussex men and one from Surrey face extradition to Spain after a boat with £8m of cannabis destined for the UK was stopped between Morocco and Spain. (1) Two arrested in Wisbech park murder investigation (1) Two arrests over 'firearm threat' in Cumbria: (1) Two charged with Peckham murder of Sylvester Akapalara: (1) Two charges over £6million Torbay cocaine haul (1) Two gangs of men who fought a pitched battle with baseball bats (1) Two held in Galway drugs gang sting: (1) Two men accused of helping gunman Raoul Moat will face charges of attempting to murder David Rathband (1) Two men are due to appear in court charged with murdering a 55-year-old man in Belfast. (1) Two men arrested in Blackburn murder inquiry (1) Two men arrested over £1.5m cocaine seizure (1) Two men seriously injured during Samurai sword attack (1) Two men were jailed for life after an illegal immigrant was murdered and dumped in a canal following a drugs feud (1) Two more men arrested over Boxing Day gang fight (1) Two slabs of cocaine were found in a false compartment in her suitcase (1) Two teenagers who killed a man in Cheshire in a dispute over drugs have been detained for five years. (1) Two_men_on_motorbike_sought_for_murder (1) UK becomes 'cocaine capital of the western world' (1) United fans await sentence over 'Wild West saloon brawl' (1) VIOLENCE erupted in Burnley town centre on Monday afternoon when two gangs of men confronted each other with baseball bats. (1) Vince Richard Hubbard (1) Vincent Tabak charged with Joanna Yeates murder (1) WALTHAM FOREST: 367 knife crimes in past year (1) Warning over anti-virus cold calls to UK internet users (1) Wartime ‘trophy gun’ fired in gang murder of student (1) Was Browns phone hacked as well? Pressure mounts to re-open Scotland Yard enquiry (1) Wayne Bassnett shot in the head by assassin in Hale (1) Wealthy BA pilot to stand trial for 'murder of estranged wife' (1) Wednesday will see the anniversary of the killing that ended Lennon's iconoclastic career (1) West Derby (1) Whistleblowing MP shops 6 more colleagues to police over expenses fraud | (1) Widnes man shot dead in Pepper Street near Town Lane in Hale Village (1) Widowed British honeymooner Shrien Dewani will be arrested and charged with murder of his wife Anni if he returns to South Africa (1) Wilbert Dyce (1) Williams had been logging onto bondage Web sites and had visited a drag cabaret in the British capital four days before his death. (1) Woman accused of tube murder was undergoing sex change (1) Woman charged with murder of transvestite (1) Woman stands trial for double murder to which ex-lover confessed (1) Woman's body found washed up in Kent bay (1) Women jailed over bodysuit drug smuggling bid (1) Y Waen (1) Yorkshire 'car key burglary' gang locked up (1) Youth killed as Afghan groups clash (1) Zac Olumegbon (1) a British citizen (1) a class-A drug (1) a hammer and pickaxe handle in a car park (1) admitted carrying out the raid at Lostwithiel on 13 August. (1) admitted theft and fraud by false representation. (1) after he arrived at the airport on Sunday night (1) aged 32 from John Mace Road (1) alarm and distress' to people living nearby (1) and Angel Campoverde (1) and Ivan Marshall (1) and James MacPherson (1) and Jayson Hassan (1) and Rackheath (1) and Scott Taylor (1) and found to be carrying 1.515 tons of cocaine. (1) and on Christmas shoppers (1) and uses cash instead of credit cards (1) arrested over knifed pregnant teenager (1) average amount stolen equated to £1 (1) blasted 11 shots at helpless Eddie Boyd - hitting him five times - as his young daughter screamed in terror. (1) but the Navy boat crews recovered two (1) cannabis and weapons were seized by police who raided 25 houses and apartments. (1) central Clydebank (1) central London (1) charged with murder in Great Yarmouth: (1) checks into hotels under false names (1) corrupt police officer helped his drug lord brother by hiding guns and threatening witnesses (1) death of Julian Gardner (1) discovered a world where automatic pistols (1) drag cabaret (1) drugs squad found 13 mature and 35 immature plants (1) dundee-united-stars-david-goodwillie-scott-allan-arrested-after-4am-street-brawl (1) dyes his hair (1) family friendship leads to second murder investigation (1) five Italian gangsters - known locally as the Camorra - are seen sweeping into a restaurant while families are eating before marching up to a corner table where their targets are sitting. (1) fled a club soaked in blood and clutching a 6in wound (1) flew the plane but says he did not know drugs were on board. (1) former girlfriend of gunman Raoul Moat has told a court of the moment the killer shot dead her new boyfriend then turned his shotgun on her (1) found stabbed to death (1) four (1) from Ballygonney Road West In Moneymore were refused bail. (1) from Brixton Hill (1) from Deramore Gardens in Belfast and Warren Martin (1) from Fulham (1) from Moss Lane (1) from Plymouth (1) from Rushey Hey (1) from Tottenham (1) gang drugs war in Greater Manchester. (1) gangland crime in Limerick (1) gangs have shaped the streets and changed the nature of UK crime (1) grieving father of a student who was raped and murdered pleaded with her suspected killer to give himself up (1) had caused 'a great deal of harassment (1) has been charged with importing a class B drug. (1) has made a new and lengthy statement to police (1) have been accused of killing Mr Yepez (1) he claimed he was one of the main players in north London and could get hold of better weapons than Scotland Yard (1) heroin worth nearly £2 million was seized in a single drugs bust in the Scottish capital (1) highest rates of teenage alcohol-related injuries in Europe (1) highlight London's crime rate and youth alcohol problems (1) his brother Ronnie and notorious English serial killer Graham Young escaping from prison. (1) imprisonment of a woman in Wales for withdrawing rape allegations against her husband is a nightmarish addition to the discrimination awaiting women and girls who seek justice (1) in January. (1) in his mid-40s (1) including some in Rochdale (1) is due to appear at South Western Magistrates' Court in Battersea this morning (1) is the first Western on trial in an Iraqi court since a 2009 U.S.-Iraqi security agreement lifted immunity for foreign contractors. (1) jail terms totalling more than 63 years to William Byrne and 14 crooks linked to his gang. (1) just months (1) known locally as Eddie (1) made more than £1m from crime. He must pay £100 (1) major rural crime wave could break out across Wales (1) man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering a man who was shot dead in south Manchester. (1) man has been shot dead by an off-duty police officer during a suspected robbery at a petrol station. (1) man in his 20s has been arrested over the murder of a champion kickboxer in Dundalk (1) moved to Thailand in 2006 to study the deadly Muay Thai fighting style (1) murdering honeymooner Anni Dewani in Cape Town (1) night-time signalling between vessels at sea and people on the shore (1) of Ansty Road (1) of Clapham (1) of Common Road (1) of Forest Gate (1) of Haig Avenue (1) of Hapton (1) of Looe (1) of Mount Avenue (1) of Oxford Road (1) of Pennyvoss Road (1) of Queen Street (1) of School Lane (1) often borrowed from friends (1) on 3 January when he was shot in the chest. (1) prison officer has been arrested after attempting to smuggle drugs into Mountjoy prison today. (1) seized 180 kilograms of ketamine in Felixstowe (1) seized a haul of scam post in a bid to tackle the UK-wide fraudulent mail blight. (1) seven men and five women found Hodgson guilty of murder at Teesside Crown Court. (1) sleeps on sofas and floors (1) south Kilmarnock and Dalkeith in Midlothian (1) stabbed both his parents to death after his mother called him a “f------ idiot” for lying in bed all morning with a hangover. (1) submachine guns and even hand grenades were being sold for as little as £50 (1) taxi firm has been denied an operator’s licence following police claims of criminal links (1) teenager was killed and another injured when two balaclava-wearing gunmen opened fire on a group of four young friends (1) the Gilnow Road gang (1) the eldest son of Viscount Trenchard (1) the famous fashion designer recently committed suicide by intake of a mixture of the cocaine (1) three dogs performing searches on vehicles entering the 14 jails across the Republic. (1) using guns in deadly drug disputes (1) was ambushed by four young men at the gates of Park Campus School in nearby West Norwood. (1) was arrested at Bali Ngurah Rai International Airport (1) was arrested by UK Border Agency officers in Coquelles (1) was blasted at least three times outside a relative’s home in South Cantril Avenue (1) was convicted in 2003 of hiring two “mules” to carry cocaine (1) was given three life sentences earlier this month. (1) was given three years and nine months behind bars after police found £1 million from the heist in the boot of his car. (1) was released after several hours of questioning over the shooting of Nicky Ayers (1) was shot at close range at least three times outside his daughter’s home in South Cantril Avenue (1) was shot dead in Tillingbourne Gardens (1) was sitting in a silver Volvo on Utting Avenue (1) were ambushed as they were driven through the vast shantytown of Gugulethu in South Africa (1) were among 13 men from around the country involved in the criminal group. (1) were found in 24 of the 33 pubs in and around Alnwick (1) were gunned down outside Strang House (1) were not legally married. (1) were part of a gang that brought in an estimated 16 tonnes of the drug. (1) which is in liquidation (1) who 'fired shots in party battle' arrested for attempted murder (1) who attended the hearing (1) who has already been sentenced to life imprisonment for the two killings (1) who reached No 3 in April with I Need You Tonight (1) whose ring nickname was Pitbull (1) wife of BA pilot vanishes from £3million B;B mansion (1) will be extradited over the murder of Kinga Legg (1) you can never move on with your life.'" (1) young boy has been shot dead. (1) £100m cocaine gang sentenced to 200 years in prison (1) £48k seized from Amsterdam passenger (1) £6m of drugs seized from Lancashire's streets (1) ‘Sick’ Dewani’s bail strategy (1) “Fragile” Shrien Dewani leaves hospital (1)

FeedBurner FeedCount